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Jumpouts and Trials – The First Step to Spring Riches

One can tell that spring is in the air when you see the number of horses being presented for trials. Be they youngsters who are now a year older, recent imports or older warriors set for a new preparation, connections are excited about their possibilities over the next three months.

On Tuesday at Cranbourne, Chaillot showed that she retained that finishing dash that won her the Group 3 Frances Tressady Stakes last prep, while in the same trial, Tigre Royale, in his workman like fashion, gave every indication that he will step up in class this prep after a long layoff.

Chaillot and Tigre Royale tune up for their spring campaigns

An hour later, again in the same trial, the evergreen Inverloch showed his customary front running style in winning the heat, while Harmysian, a recent import with Clayton Douglas, gave Jamie Kah the feel of a good horse when finishing just behind Inverloch.

Inverloch wins his Cranbourne trial with recent import Harmysian on his heels in fifth

In the following trial, Inverell, in his first public appearance since arriving from New Zealand, pinged the gates to lead up the heat, while Tiifu, recovering from injury, put in a solid performance to finish midfield.

Earlier in the morning and a thousand kilometres North, Attorney, the winner of two Group races last spring, mixed it with Quick Thinker in the COVID impacted Warwick Farm trials. Both looked good as they campaign for the major spring handicaps.

Quick Thinker wins his Warwick Farm trial, with Attorney finishing in third

On Tuesday morning at Warrnambool, trainers organised their own private jumpouts to ensure that their horses progressed at the same rate as their city counterparts. Unraced import, Enosi, worked with Artarmon, Darvin and Seawhatyouthink. All look well-placed to win their share of races in the next few months.

Only in recent times have the European jurisdictions seen the benefit of jump-outs and trials, with Dundalk in Ireland now embracing them as a way to educate and prepare horses for the races. With fewer proper galloping tracks available, as compared to Europe, few trainers in Australia would disagree that they are critical to a horse’s preparation.